Pokémon Go shouldn’t have full access to your Gmail, Docs and Google account — but it does | TechCrunch

When you use Google to sign into Pokémon Go, as so many of you have already, the popular game for some reason grants itself (for some users, anyway) the..

Source: Pokémon Go shouldn’t have full access to your Gmail, Docs and Google account — but it does | TechCrunch

Yes, you can run desktop Linux apps in Windows 10 thanks to Ubuntu on Windows – Liliputing

One of the most surprising new features coming to Windows 10 this summer is “Ubuntu on Windows,” which basically brings a complete Ubuntu Linux file system to Microsoft’s operating system and allows developers to run Bash and command-line apps. But what about desktop apps with a graphical user interface? Officially Windows 10 doesn’t support those. […]

Source: Yes, you can run desktop Linux apps in Windows 10 thanks to Ubuntu on Windows – Liliputing

Avast acquires rival AVG for $1.3 billion to create a security software giant | VentureBeat | Business | by Paul Sawers

Security software giant Avast Software has acquired rival AVG Technologies. Avast will pay $25 cash for each of AVG’s outstanding ordinary shares in a deal amounting to around $1.3 billion.

Source: Avast acquires rival AVG for $1.3 billion to create a security software giant | VentureBeat | Business | by Paul Sawers

New Mac malware can remotely access FaceTime camera, but macOS Gatekeeper users are protected

A new piece of Mac-targeting malware is in the wild, potentially allowing hackers to remotely execute code and even control the FaceTime camera on a user’s computer, but Apple’s own Gatekeeper security prevents the unsigned app from being installed.

Source: New Mac malware can remotely access FaceTime camera, but macOS Gatekeeper users are protected

From HummingBad to Worse: New In-Depth Details and Analysis of the HummingBad Android Malware Campaign | Check Point Blog

For five months, Check Point mobile threat researchers had unprecedented access to the inner-workings of Yingmob, a group of Chinese cyber criminals behind the HummingBad malware campaign. HummingBad is a malware Check Point discovered that establishes a persistent rootkit on Android devices, generates fraudulent ad revenue, and installs additional fraudulent apps. Yingmob runs alongside a legitimate Chinese advertising analytics company, sharing its resources and technology. The group is highly organized with 25 employees that staff four separate groups responsible for developing HummingBad’s malicious components.

Source: From HummingBad to Worse: New In-Depth Details and Analysis of the HummingBad Android Malware Campaign | Check Point Blog